1911-S CAC $10 Eagle

CAC Coins Bring Premiums in September

CAC-approved coins — certified coins with a special label from Certified Acceptance Corporation indicating coins of higher quality than normal for their labeled grade — outperformed other certified coins in auctions in California and Internet sales during September. Here are 10 examples, which were selected from a large number of results that could have been listed.

  • On September 3, in Los Angeles, the Goldbergs auctioned a CAC-approved MS66 grade 1955-D quarter for $168. Certified MS66 1955-D quarters that did not have stickers of approval from CAC were sold in May 2018, by DLRC for $90 and by Heritage for $89. These three 1955-D quarters were encapsulated by the same grading service, and each non-CAC 1955-D brought more than 45% less than the just mentioned CAC approved MS66 1955-D quarter.
  • On September 3, in Los Angeles, the Goldbergs auctioned a CAC-approved, NGC-graded MS63 1854 half dollar for $1,440. Although a non-CAC MS63 1854 half has not recently been in a major auction, Heritage auctioned three without CAC stickers in 2016, a PCGS-graded MS63 coin in October for $940, an NGC-graded MS63 1854 half in April also for $940, and a PCGS-graded MS63 1854 in January for $1,410.
  • On September 3, the Goldbergs auctioned a CAC-approved, NGC-graded MS63 1861 $20 gold coin for $21,000. A few days later, at the Long Beach Expo, Heritage auctioned a PCGS-graded MS63 1861 $20 gold coin, which was not CAC approved, for $16,000, 23.8% less.
  • A CAC-approved 1901 Indian cent that is certified as MS66 Red brought $1,560 on September 6 in the Heritage auction at the Long Beach Expo. At the ANA Convention in August two different auction firms sold certified MS66 Red 1901 Indian cents, for $780 and $1,020, respectively. Neither of these had a green sticker of approval from CAC. Also, at the prior Long Beach Expo, in the middle of June 2018, another non-CAC, certified MS66 Red 1901 cent was auctioned for $720. The CAC-approved 1901 clearly brought far more than others with the same certification from the same grading service. This $1,560 result on September 6 was not strangely high, as the very same CAC-approved 1901 cent in the same holder had been auctioned for significantly more in the past, $2,300 in January 2008.
  • On September 6, Heritage auctioned an NGC-certified Proof-65 1895 silver dollar with a CAC sticker for $87,000. In January 2018, at the FUN Convention, the same firm auctioned a PCGS-certified PR65 silver dollar, without a CAC sticker, for $66,000. Also, in July at the Summer FUN Convention, Heritage auctioned a non-CAC PR65 1895 dollar with a Cameo designation for $78,000.
  • At the September Long Beach Expo, Heritage auctioned two certified PR66 Red & Brown 1866 two cent pieces, which were encapsulated by the same grading service. The 1866 that was CAC approved realized $3,360 on September 6, and the 1866 without a sticker brought just $1,920 on September 7.
  • At the Long Each Expo, Heritage auctioned three certified MS65 1878-CC Morgan dollars in consecutive lots on September 7. The NGC-graded MS65 1878-CC had a CAC sticker and brought $1,440. The two PCGS graded MS65 1878-CC Morgans were not CAC approved and each brought just $1,080, 25% less.
  • On September 9, Heritage auctioned a NGC graded MS64 1860 three cent silver, with a CAC sticker, for $540. Earlier this year, in March, the same firm auctioned a PCGS MS64 1860 three cent silver, without a CAC sticker, for $408.
  • On September 9, GreatCollections sold a CAC-approved, MS63 grade 1914-D $2-1/2 gold coin for $1,299.38. Literally the same day, Heritage sold two that were not CAC approved, one MS63 1914-D brought $720 and the second realized $780. On August 22, Stack’s-Bowers sold a certified MS63 1914-D, without a CAC sticker, for $840.
  • On September 23, GreatCollections sold a CAC-approved MS62 No Motto 1907 $10 gold coin for $1,434.38. On September 3, the Goldbergs auctioned another MS62 No Motto 1907 $10 gold coin for $1,140, without a CAC sticker. The MS62 No Motto 1907 that Heritage sold on September 7 for $1,020 also did not have a CAC sticker. All three were certified by the same grading service. The CAC approved coin brought substantially more than the other two during the same month in the same state.