1793 Half Cent

CAC Coins Bring Premiums at FUN Auction in Orlando

The official auction of the FUN Convention was conducted by Heritage during the middle of January at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Florida. CAC-approved coins brought substantial premiums over coins of the same date, type and certified grade sold at the auction or previously.

Here are 10 examples among many that could be listed.

  1. A CAC-approved AU50 1793 half cent was auctioned for $37,200. A few minutes later, a PCGS-graded AU50 1793 half cent without a CAC sticker sold for $20,400.
  2. A CAC-approved AU53 1793 Chain cent of the AMERICA – No Periods variety realized $102,000. In June 2017, another major auction firm sold a PCGS-graded AU53 1793 Chain cent of the AMERICA – No Periods variety without a CAC sticker for $79,312.50.
  3. A CAC-approved MS67 1924 Buffalo nickel realized $25,200. This could possibly be an auction record for a 1924 nickel. During the last 10 years, the highest result for a PCGS- or NGC-graded MS67 1924 nickel without a CAC sticker was $12,925. It was a PCGS-graded MS67 coin in a February 2014 auction.
  4. There were two PCGS-graded MS64 1808/7 half dollars in this FUN auction. They were both struck from the same pair of dies. The CAC-approved 1808/7 half dollar realized $22,800 seconds after the PCGS-graded MS64 1808/7 half dollar without a CAC sticker brought $10,800, less than half the price.
  5. An NGC-certified Proof-66 1880 Morgan silver dollar with a CAC sticker realized $11,400. Less than four weeks later on February 3, Heritage auctioned a PCGS-certified Proof-66 1880 Morgan silver dollar without a CAC sticker for $5760. The NGC-certified coin with a CAC sticker brought almost twice as much as the PCGS-certified coin without a CAC sticker.
  6. There were two PCGS-graded MS62 1884-S Morgan silver dollars in this FUN auction in consecutive lots. The CAC-approved MS62 1884-S Morgan silver dollar brought $21,600 moments after the PCGS-graded MS62 1884-S Morgan silver dollar without a CAC sticker realized $16,200.
  7. A CAC-approved MS66 1887-O Morgan silver dollar was auctioned for $43,200. In February 2018 in an auction at a Long Beach Expo, a PCGS-graded MS66 1887-O Morgan silver dollar without a CAC sticker brought $28,800, much less than the CAC-approved coin.
  8. A CAC-approved AU53 1861-D $5 gold coin realized $60,000. At the ANA Convention in August 2016, a PCGS-graded AU53 1861-D $5 gold coin without a CAC sticker realized $42,314.10. Previously in January 2016 at a FUN Convention, a PCGS-graded AU55 1861-D $5 gold without a CAC sticker went for $54,050. This year, a CAC-approved AU53 1861-D $5 gold coin brought more than a non-CAC, PCGS-graded AU55 (which is notably higher than AU53) 1861-D $5 gold coin did three years ago. 1861-D $5 gold coins are not auctioned very often.
  9. A CAC-approved AU55 1804 $10 gold coin with a crosslet 4 brought $90,000. Last February at a Long Beach Expo, a PCGS-graded AU55 1804 $10 gold crosslet 4 without a CAC sticker was auctioned for $50,400.
  10. In this FUN auction event, there were three PCGS-graded MS64 1914-S $10 gold coins. Two of the three were CAC-approved. These realized $13,200 and $12,000, respectively. The one that did not have a CAC sticker sold for $5280, less than half as much as either of the CAC-approved MS64 1914-S $10 gold coins.